Wildfire

Definition
Wildland fires are fires caused by nature or humans that result in the uncontrolled destruction of forests, brush, field crops, grasslands and real and personal property.

The wildland fire season in Oregon usually begins in early July and typically culminates in late September with a moisture event; however, wildland fires have occurred in every month of the year. Drought, snow pack, and local weather conditions can expand the length of the fire season. The early and late shoulders of the fire season usually are associated with human-caused fires. Lightning generally is the cause of most fires in the peak fire period of July, August and early September.

Short-term loss caused by a wildland fire can include the destruction of timber, wildlife habitat, scenic vistas and watersheds, as well as vulnerability to flooding due to the destruction of watersheds. Long-term effects include smaller timber harvests, reduced access to affected recreational areas, destruction of cultural and economic resources and community infrastructure.

Preparing for a possible fire could save your life! View resources below for more information and tips.

Resources